Quasi-Objects

Anthropology/Archives/Material Things/Visual Stuff...and Assorted Ephemera.

Sure book sale, I’ll take Jane Bennett’s “Vibrant Matter” and Julie Cruikshank’s “The Social Life of Stories” for a dollar a piece. 

"You cannot judge the real nature of a European revolutionary doctrine on the basis of the changes it proposes to make within the European power structure and society. You can only judge it by the effects it will have on non-European peoples. This is because every revolution in European history has served to reinforce Europe’s tendencies and abilities to export destruction to other peoples, other cultures and the environment itself. I defy anyone to point out an example where this is not true." - Russell Means, 1980

spencerjohn:

pasttensevancouver:
Native men worked as longshoremen on Burrard Inlet since before Vancouver was incorporated. In many cases, several generations of men from the same family worked on the docks beginning as young as thirteen or fourteen years old. Members of several of the families that lived in Stanley Park earned money through longshoring, including William Nahanee, pictured in front holding a bag in this 1889 photo. Numerous indigenous leaders worked as longshoremen, including Andy Paull, Chief Dan George, Chief Simon Baker, and Chief Joe Capilano, who used money earned on the waterfront to finance a trip to London to lobby the King for the rights of BC’s First Nations in 1906.
In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, specialization on the waterfront roughly followed racial lines, and the work gangs comprised primarily of indigenous men became known for their skill and efficiency in handling lumber. They were also the first to organize a longshoremen’s union in 1906, Local 526 of the militant Industrial Workers of the World, informally known as the “Bows and Arrows.” Although Local 526 lasted less than a year, other “Bows and Arrows” unions followed until all longshoremen became part of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union after WWII.   
Source: William Nahanee and a group of longshoremen on the dock of Moodyville Sawmill by Charles S Bailey, 1889, City of Vancouver Archives #Mi P2

Also part of this story are the groups of indigenous Hawaiians that lived at Kanaka Ranch in what is now Stanley Park and worked in the lumber industry.

spencerjohn:

pasttensevancouver:

Native men worked as longshoremen on Burrard Inlet since before Vancouver was incorporated. In many cases, several generations of men from the same family worked on the docks beginning as young as thirteen or fourteen years old. Members of several of the families that lived in Stanley Park earned money through longshoring, including William Nahanee, pictured in front holding a bag in this 1889 photo. Numerous indigenous leaders worked as longshoremen, including Andy Paull, Chief Dan George, Chief Simon Baker, and Chief Joe Capilano, who used money earned on the waterfront to finance a trip to London to lobby the King for the rights of BC’s First Nations in 1906.

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, specialization on the waterfront roughly followed racial lines, and the work gangs comprised primarily of indigenous men became known for their skill and efficiency in handling lumber. They were also the first to organize a longshoremen’s union in 1906, Local 526 of the militant Industrial Workers of the World, informally known as the “Bows and Arrows.” Although Local 526 lasted less than a year, other “Bows and Arrows” unions followed until all longshoremen became part of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union after WWII.   

Source: William Nahanee and a group of longshoremen on the dock of Moodyville Sawmill by Charles S Bailey, 1889, City of Vancouver Archives #Mi P2

Also part of this story are the groups of indigenous Hawaiians that lived at Kanaka Ranch in what is now Stanley Park and worked in the lumber industry.

(via lifeaquatic)

Playing the old “my office hours are supposed to be from 2-4, but who am I kidding I won’t even stick around til 3” game…

At UNESCO conference on digitization. They have free juice.

Meeting with supervisor tomorrow. I need a kick in the ass.

Hey is it too late to switch my PhD topic to studying the world of Dad Boner?